Record means little against the rapidly advancing tide

Embattled Carlton coach Brett Ratten leaves the club this afternoon.CAROLINE WILSON: Last supper came early for RattenROBERT WALLS: Malthouse a big risk as Blues err in axing Ratten
Nanjing Night Net

MANY factors can kill an AFL coaching stint. At Carlton, for Brett Ratten, it has been the convergence of several.

The high expectations of a club with as many premierships as any, and a bar raised to a top-four spot pre-season by the coach himself. A spate of crippling injuries that derailed the Blues’ season when, after three good wins to start the season, they were flag favourites.

The humiliation of a loss to a wooden spoon candidate that led to the club missing out on the finals. And the availability, and obvious interest, of a former revered coaching peer, Mick Malthouse, waiting in the wings.

If the end wasn’t coming already for Ratten, despite having a year left on his contract, last Saturday night’s shock loss to Gold Coast inflicted the fatal wound. And Malthouse’s clear interest in coaching again, as apparent as it’s ever been since last weekend, was the final nail in the coffin.

But Ratten will be one of the unluckier coaches to get the chop in recent memory. He took on a side, and a club, close to a basket case with six games to go in 2007 and, until this year, improved its position season by season.

From a finish of 15th in the first year, Carlton climbed to 11th in 2008 with 10 wins. In 2009, they reached the finals for the first time in eight years, only to be pipped on the post by the Brisbane Lions in an elimination final away from home.

It happened again in 2010, this time nutted on the line by Sydney. Last year, the Blues went one further, smashing Essendon in the elimination final before once again losing by less than a kick in an interstate final, this time in Perth to West Coast.

Even after this season’s less-than-sparkling performances from his team, Ratten has a winning percentage as coach of 50.8 per cent. That should have presented at least some sort of pass mark.

By way of comparison, Brisbane’s Michael Voss, approaching the end of his fourth season in charge, has a current strike rate of just 38.7 per cent. For Richmond’s Damien Hardwick, at the end of his third year at Punt Road, it’s 37.7.

That’s not to denigrate either man, both their sides seeming to have made significant strides this year. But it’s also fair to say their playing lists were in far healthier shape than was Ratten’s when he took over the Blues.

The arrival of Chris Judd certainly helped, so did some early draft picks, though the progress of the likes of Bryce Gibbs and Matthew Kreuzer has been one of a number of vigorous debates by the navy blue army, along with tactical acumen, recruiting and list development, both of those areas slammed by club greats such as Robert Walls and Mark Maclure in recent days.

The biggest question: to what extent should the senior coach be held responsible?

Ratten was seen to improve steadily over the course of his tenure in areas such as communication with his players. The balance of Carlton’s best 22 also became much improved.

The Blues at their best, seen as recently as the weekend before last, when they thrashed Essendon by 96 points, playing an attractive, attacking style, smart out of defence and potent up forward.

Yet Ratten never won the total approval of the famously impatient Carlton hordes and, more significantly, enough of his club’s board.

Those agitating for change at board level were grudging in their praise, even when the Blues began to rebound from their mid-season slump, unearthing young prospects such as Levi Casboult and Tom Bell, and hauling themselves back into finals contention

In the words of Carlton president Stephen Kernahan, before last weekend’s nightmare the Blues had won back respect. That might have saved Ratten’s bacon. Instead, the loss to the Suns fried it to a crisp.

Perhaps another coaching door might open, with Port Adelaide still on the hunt for a senior man for 2013.

Certainly, though, this one would have stayed open – as Ratten’s contract stipulated it would – had a certain triple premiership coach not been hovering in the background.

And that’s no consolation or comfort for a man who served Carlton with distinction in 255 games as a player, and at least helped haul the Blues back to respectability in 120-odd games as coach.BYE, BYE, BLUESBrett Ratten’s coaching tenure at Carlton

2007 Brett Ratten takes over as coach after Denis Pagan is sacked with six games remaining. The Blues lose all six. Carlton secures Matthew Kreuzer with the priority pick, and trades pick three and Josh Kennedy to West Coast for Chris Judd. Ratten signs a deal until the end of 2009. FINISHED: 15th

2008 Ratten’s first full season starts poorly, losing the first three games. He swings the momentum with two wins over Collingwood and Richmond. FINISHED:11th (10 wins, 12 losses)

2009 Carlton makes the finals for the first time since 2001 but squanders a big lead in its elimination final against the Brisbane Lions. The Blues are in crisis after Brendan Fevola’s Brownlow Medal night scandal and put him up for trade. The coach signs a contract until the end of 2011. FINISHED: 7th (13-10)

2010 The Blues are again bundled out in an elimination final, against Sydney by a goal. Ratten is told by players he needs to take more interest in them as people. FINISHED: 8th (11-12)

2011 Under pressure all season about his contract, but the Blues win their first final in 10 years and almost pull off a miracle victory against West Coast in Perth. Ratten earns a two-year contract extension. FINISHED: 5th (15-8-1)

2012 PRE-SEASON: Carlton loses all its pre-season matches but Ratten declares anything short of a top-four finish will be considered a failure. ROUND TWO: Ratten becomes the third person in Carlton’s history to play and coach 100 games. The following week, the Blues smash Collingwood and become premiership favourites. ROUND EIGHT: Carlton loses Marc Murphy to a long-term shoulder injury, escalating a horror injury run. ROUND 10: Media pressure and supporter backlash intensifies after the Blues lose to Port Adelaide. Links between Mick Malthouse and the Carlton job surface after Eddie McGuire declares the former Pies coach would be a perfect fit for the Blues. ROUND 15: The Age reports Ratten will coach for his future against Collingwood after a run of six losses in seven games to fall out of the top eight. Carlton upsets the Pies and wins four of its next six games to rekindle finals hopes. ROUND 22: A disastrous loss to Gold Coast ends Carlton’s finals chances. YESTERDAY: It is revealed Ratten’s coaching career at Carlton is finished, with a year to run on his contract. POSITION: Carlton currently 10th (11-10)

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Elephant Man on show in Adamstown

The title character in The Elephant Man is based on a real-life person who was born with hideous deformities. But writer Bernard Pomerance calls for him to be performed without prosthetics or elaborate make-up.
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And that, as actor Timothy Blundell notes, is a challenge for the person playing John Merrick.

Blundell is cast as Merrick in a production of The Elephant Man that will be the first community work staged in the new 577-seat The Factory theatre at Adamstown’s St Pius X High School from September 7 to 15.

Merrick’s deformities, which are described by a surgeon early in the play, included an enormous head with a bony jutting forehead that almost hid one eye and a nose that was a lump of flesh. His right arm and legs were enormous and shapeless and as a child he suffered a hip disease that forced him to walk with a stick.

Amazingly, his left arm was perfectly formed.

Merrick, who was born in England in 1862, was christened Joseph but has come to be known as John. He became a carnival freak at an early age and was exhibited under the name the Elephant Man.

He was studied by a sympathetic surgeon, Frederick Treves, and lived the last years of his life in a London hospital, where he became a celebrity, with visitors who came to meet him including Alexandra, Princess of Wales. He died in 1890, aged 27.

Research still continues into the cause of his horrendous deformities.

Timothy Blundell, who has extensively researched Merrick to help him play the role, says it is important to play him without make-up because the records show there was a normal, clear-thinking person beneath the ugly exterior.

At the same time, he has to suggest Merrick’s deformities through his movements – but given those deformities his body movements are limited.

“The only parts I can use are my left arm and movements to the head,” he says. “Merrick also had a speech impediment, so that also makes it a bit harder.”

While the role is the most difficult he has played in physical terms, Blundell also regards it as one of the most important.

“I want audiences to see the human being behind the ugliness of his deformities,” he says. “We shouldn’t judge people by the way they look, their religion or other such factors. If we can stop and learn more about them, we might come to appreciate, as this play shows, the people who are different from us.”

The Elephant Man won the year’s major best production awards, including a Tony, when it was staged on Broadway in 1979.

Director Don McEwen has assembled a first-rate cast, many of whom play multiple roles. The actors include Wayne Jarman as Frederick Treves, Susan McEwen as actress Mrs Kendal, who befriended Merrick, and Rod Ansell, Alan Bodenham, Sue Hart, Maddison Molenaar and Richard Thomas.

The Factory is one of two amphitheatre-style venues in a $5 million redevelopment of a former Lustre Hosiery factory in the St Pius school grounds. The smaller theatre holds 70 people.

The idea of including a major theatre in the redevelopment was put forward by McEwen, who was teaching a vocational education training course at St Pius. He served as a technical adviser for the theatre.

The Elephant Man has many settings but companies staging the show generally opt for an all-purpose stage design.

McEwen is using the colourful backdrop of a circus tent. It symbolises the world Merrick grew up in, but which he put very much behind him in the productive last years of his life.

* The Elephant Man, an Adenau and 5 Minute Call production, can be seen at The Factory on Friday and Saturday at 8pm, from September 7 to 15, plus an 8pm performance on Wednesday, September 12, and a 2pm matinee on Saturday, September 15. Tickets: $38; concession $34; child/student $28. Bookings: Civic Ticketek, 49291977.The Factory is at the rear of the St Pius X buildings. There is a car park adjoining the venue. The entrance to the grounds is through a gate on Park Avenue near the street’s crossing of the former Belmont railway branch line that is now part of the Fernleigh Track.

THE ELEPHANT MAN: Will be performed without any prosthetics. Picture: Brock Perks

Hits and Mrs as Ann Romney steals Republican hearts

Ann Romney waves with her husband Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney during the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Florida.Ann Romney, the wife of the Republican Party’s new candidate, Mitt, stole the heart of the Republican National Convention in Florida by telling the audience she wanted to talk about love, not politics.
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Appearing on stage in a dress in a bold shade of red, so popular among Republican women, to a roar and chants of “We love you!” Mrs Romney began by saying: “Tonight I want to talk to you about love.

“I want to talk to you about the deep and abiding love I have for a man I met at a dance many years ago. And the profound love I have, and I know we share, for this country.

“I want to talk to you about that love so deep only a mother can fathom it – the love we have for our children and our children’s children.”

It was immediately clear that the party, sections of which had to be cajoled – or even bullied – into backing Mr Romney, has readily embraced his wife.

Mrs Romney spoke about how hard mothers worked to sustain families.

“It’s the moms of this nation – single, married, widowed – who really hold this country together.

“We’re the mothers, we’re the wives, we’re the grandmothers, we’re the big sisters, we’re the little sisters, we’re the daughters.

“You are the best of America,” she said. “You are the hope of America.”

It was an effective if not subtle appeal to American women, many of whom have been disaffected by the growing hardline stance on women’s health issues within the GOP.

Crucially she celebrated rather than avoided Mr Romney’s record as the head and founder of private equity firm Bain Capital, which has been the subject of sustained attacks by the Democrats, whose ads describe it as a vessel of pirate capitalism.

She won another when she invoked the campaign’s unofficial slogan: “As his partner on this amazing journey, I can tell you Mitt Romney was not handed success. He. Built. It.”

All day, speakers had repeated the phrase, based on a very selective quote from off-the-cuff remarks by the President, who said of successful people, “you didn’t build that”, before detailing how society aids its members.In conclusion she reassured America that, “You can trust Mitt. He loves America. He will take us to a better place, just as he took me home safely from that dance.”

Some have already compared her speech to the address that propelled President Obama to fame in 2004.As the house band struck up a rendition of My Girl, Mr Romney appeared on stage behind her with a dewy-eyed smile, thrilling an audience that had not expected to see him until later in the convention.

The convention’s tough-talking keynote speaker, New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, took another tack.He all but denounced love as a stumbling block on the path to establishing a new US century.

Governor Christie scowled as he finished his half-hour speech about how America must learn the importance of respect over love if it is going to stake out a second American century.

“The greatest lesson Mom ever taught me, though, was this one: she told me there would be times in your life when you have to choose between being loved and being respected,” he said.

“I have learnt over time that it applies just as much to leadership. In fact, I think that advice applies to America today more than ever.

“I believe we have become paralysed by our desire to be loved.”

A great cheer.

He described the fights he had won against the teacher’s union.

Eventually he turned to Mr Romney’s role in rebuilding America.

“Mitt Romney will tell us the hard truths we need to hear to put us back on the path to growth and create good paying private sector jobs again in America,” he said to an ovation of the 20,000 strong crowd in the Tampa sports arena.

“Mitt Romney will tell us the hard truths we need to hear to end the torrent of debt that is compromising our future and burying our economy.

“Mitt Romney will tell us the hard truths we need to hear to end the debacle of putting the world’s greatest healthcare system in the hands of federal bureaucrats and putting those bureaucrats between an American citizen and her doctor.”

Throughout the afternoon speakers from across the new spectrum of the Republican Party – fiscal conservative through to social conservative – had addressed the increasingly excited audience.

Scott Walker, the Wisconsin Governor famed for surviving an election after a bruising battle against unions, received the first spontaneous ovation from the stands.

Later Rick Santorum, the fierce Catholic conservative who had been the last to concede defeat to Mr Romney, won another sustained ovation when he raised the social issues that have become so important to the Republican base, but an awkward wedge issue to its establishment.

He declared that the GOP was the one party that lifts up all children – “born and unborn”.

“I thank God that America still has one party that reaches out their hands in love to lift up all of God’s children – born and unborn, and says that each of us has dignity and all of us have the right to live the American Dream.”

Among addresses by the Republican tough guys, other women appeared on stage including governors of South Carolina Nikki Haley and the Governor of New Mexico Susana Martinez. Mrs Romney was introduced by Luce Fortuno, the Governor of Puerto Rico.

Not everything went to plan throughout the afternoon. Stubborn and vocal supporters of the libertarian Ron Paul chanted and booed during the early afternoon session when the Republican Party adopted rule changes that would make their sort of internal party insurgency more difficult.

And later during the day, as their colleagues hectored arriving delegates in the street with megaphones, Paul’s delegates refused to direct their votes to Romney, prompting more chanting and jeering during the roll-call of the states, an event the organisers had hoped would be a unanimous surge for Mr Romney.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Guinness Peat Group posts loss after copping fine

The once mighty Guinness Peat Group, a famed billion dollar corporate raider that could strike fear in the hearts of company directors across three continents, has fallen into the red after being whacked with a 110 million euro ($133 million) fine by a European court.
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The loss was announced as one of GPG’s biggest holdings, financial services group ClearView Wealth, received a revised takeover offer of 55 cents per share this afternoon from private equity-led consortium Crescent and which also includes a special dividend of 2.2 cents per share.

The improved offer has won the backing of ClearView’s board as well as GPG which owns 47.3 per cent of the wealth manager and stands to realise $122 million in proceeds if the bid succeeds.

Formerly the plaything of stockpicker Sir Ron Brierley but now in wind-down mode, GPG is looking to dispose of most of its assets after years of underperformance and shareholder disquiet.

GPG said it posted a first-half loss of £36 million ($55 million) due to a bigger than expected fine related to previous wrongdoing at its industrial threads business Coats, with that threads operation also stumbling due to a global downturn in underlying demand for clothing and footwear.

Coats, wholly owned by GPG, was slapped with a fine for market fixing that was considerably bigger than the sum GPG had originally provided for in its accounts. GPG said the provision held for the fine was based on judgments reached after taking external advice.

In his statement to shareholders GPG chairman Rob Campbell said proceeds from asset sales including disposals from its international equities portfolio hit £168 million for the year to August.

It made a profit of £37 million on asset sales, up from £35 million a year earlier. Total proceeds from asset sales since January 2011 now stand at £310 million. Group revenue for the first half fell by £66 million, or 11 per cent, to £533 million.

Mr Campbell said during the first half the company had focused on strengthening its Coats subsidiary for it to be the core of GPG by the end of the financial year, selling investments that had no long term value and setting out a clear plan for its legacy pension schemes linked to its operations.

Coats trading performance in the first half was behind plan and combined with adverse movements in exchange rates. The business saw revenue drop 5 per cent to $US819.3 million to record a first-half loss of $US109.4 million against a profit last year of $US36.9 million in the first half.

At the end of the first half GPG’s investment portfolio was worth £363 million, mostly consisting stakes in listed Australian companies. GPG did not declare a first-half dividend.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Goode’s exit fans Transfield takeover talk

Investors dump Transfield
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The decision by Transfield Services to put its non-executive director Graham Hunt into the role as acting chief executive makes for an interesting new phase for the company with speculation swirling that it could spark takeover activity.

The news of the current CEO Peter Goode’s sudden resignation on the same day it released its results – which were in line with expectations – took the market by surprise.

Within a few hours of trade investors had wiped almost 7 per cent off the share price. It follows news that the major shareholders in Transfield, the Belgiorno-Nettis family, which own 10.5 per cent of stock and have two brothers on the board, would step down and cut their seats from two to one.

This development has prompted at least one investor to question whether the family is about to reduce its stake in the company, which would result in an overhang of stock in the market.

In the past year, the company’s shares have fallen from $2.40 to $1.92, despite a buyback to help bolster the price.

Nervousness

The negative reaction to Goode’s announced departure speaks volumes about the nervousness of shareholders in a company that has had a string of downgrades.

When such a company then announces a changing of the guard that they had not seen coming, imaginations naturally run wild.

In Goode’s case his decision to leave came after being offered an equity partnership in British private equity group Arle – a company he has had an eight-year association with.

Goode will stay on until the end of September then take on a consulting role at Transfield.

The decision to appoint Hunt in the interim is not the first time a director has moved from non-executive duties to become the chief executive. Other examples include Foster’s and Lion Nathan.

Goode has done a number of positive things at Transfield, such as getting out of some assets that it overpaid for years earlier, and moving deeper into mining services. However, he also bought a business, Easternwell, that the market believed was over-priced and is taking too long to deliver a return.

The acquisition also needs to be fully integrated, something Transfield has struggled to do.

In the latest results Easternwell generated an EBITDA of $77 million, and forecast it would increase to $90 million to $102 million in 2013.

It issued the proviso “dependent on the strength of the mining sector.” With so much debate about whether the boom is over, this comment did not go down well by investors.

Lowered guidance

The group reported a net profit of $85 million and pre-amortisation earnings of $106 million, which met its April guidance. That goal, though, had been downgraded from its previous guidance because of bad weather and a $16 million provision for a legacy construction contract.

Whether the boom has ended or not, oil and gas construction remains at record highs, and Transfield has won some good contracts.

And in terms of the full integration at Easternwell, it is here that Hunt is well placed.

Hunt has a strong background in the mining sector, having spent 34 years at BHP in various roles, including president of its iron ore business, president of its uranium division, and president of its aluminium unit.

This choice, acting as it is, has prompted speculation that the company will continue to move into mining services, particularly as it appointed a headhunter last week to secure a North American business director for its oil-field services business in the US.

Hunt left BHP in 2009 and turned up at Lihir Gold as managing director, until it was swallowed up by Newcrest mining in late 2010. The merger resulted in shareholders getting a 50 per cent premium on the price at which he joined.

Whether Hunt’s tenure at Transfield becomes notable for takeover activity – whether as prey or predator – remains to be seen.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.