Saving my Mac from Flash

It’s time to wrestle back control of my Mac.Adobe’s Flash is one of those technologies you either love or hate. Personally I think Flash still has its place for internet video and other rich content, even though HTML5 is slowly killing it. My main gripe with Flash is that it’s such a resource pig running on a Mac, especially an older Mac relying on Intel graphics rather than the new NVIDIA graphics.Chrome is my browser of choice on Mac and Windows, in part because it features its own task manager and runs each tab and plugin as a separate process. If you’re running Chrome, it’s worth checking your plugin list to see how many versions of Flash are listed (type chrome://plugins into the URL bar). Click “Details” on the right and your full list of plugins will expand. Scroll down to Flash. If you find more than one version installed, try disabling all but the most recent version. The 11.4 update has just been released. If you find more than one copy of the latest version, such as one stored in /Library and another in /Applications, try disabling one or the other to see if the situation improves.One of the problems with the Flash plugin is that it doesn’t always give resources back after it’s finished with them. So if you’ve been playing a Flash-intensive game like Farmville, even when you close Farmville your Mac can still be incredibly sluggish. The trick is to open up the Chrome task manager and manually kill the Shockwave Flash plugin. It’s an effective solution but not very elegant.Thankfully you’ll find an elegant option for killing the Shockwave Flash plugin in FlashFrozen, which is available from the Mac App store for 99 cents. It runs in the menu bar at the top of your screen, monitoring the resources used by Shockwave Flash. You can set it to turn red when the Flash plugin hits a certain CPU usage. The simply click on the icon to kill the plugin.FlashFrozen has an auto-kill function which automatically kills the Flash plugin whenever it launches, although that’s probably not very practical. If you really want to kill off Flash but need more granular control, take a look at FlashBlock in the Chrome store. It blocks Flash content in web pages by default, but you can still click on the ones you want to watch. You can also whitelist the sites on which you always want Flash to run, for example youtube南京夜网 is whitelisted by default.It’s still hard to get by without Flash on your Mac, but thankfully you can take back control and stop it crippling your computer. Do you have trouble with Flash or other plugins crippling your computer?
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